Posts Tagged ‘sustainability’

Building Communities of Practice in Crop Research

  To spur change at the systems level, it is critical to involve many individuals and institutions that work within that system, facilitating the sharing of information and knowledge. This has been a core belief of McKnight’s Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) for many years. Our assessment, however, is that cross-sector collaboration, learning, and networking have […]

SHARE THIS:

Working Toward Equity, Sustainability in 2016 and Beyond

New Year Reflections from Kate Wolford As we begin a new year, I am very mindful of the awesome responsibility and privilege that we have in advancing the mission of The McKnight Foundation. We have a diverse and robust portfolio of program interests, all pointing toward a goal of strengthening socially, economically, and environmentally sustainable communities. […]

SHARE THIS:

From Brownfields to Breweries

  Finding Possibility in Unlikely Places Why in the world would a foundation encourage the growth of breweries? The answer has nothing to do with beer and everything to do with the increasing need to attract millennial talent in our region as aging baby boomers retire and a labor shortage looms on the horizon. Breweries […]

SHARE THIS:

Collaborative Crop Research Program Looks Back

  New report reviews three decades of strengthening food security Since the early 1980s, The McKnight Foundation has funded agricultural research around the globe with the goal to help farmers feed their families and communities. A recently completed history of the Collaborative Crop Research Program (CCRP) delves into the origins of the program from the […]

SHARE THIS:

Lorri Todd: McKnight as host, thinking green for ourselves and our guests

More than 10 years ago, McKnight relocated from a nondescript downtown office to our current site in the Washburn A Mill building, on the western bank of the Mississippi River. Although we only moved about a mile, the resulting changes in McKnight’s practices, culture, and grantee relationships were monumental. Our old space functioned as little […]

SHARE THIS: