Author Archive

Mark Muller
Mark Muller
Mark Muller is Mississippi River program director at The McKnight Foundation. Read his bio here.

New Approach, Same Goal: A Clean and Resilient River

  McKnight is proud of its 25-year history of commitment to the Mississippi River. The river has a unique and extensive impact on the economic and social fabric of Minnesota, the Midwest, and river communities down to the coast of Louisiana. We know that McKnight grantees have made a difference and improved the quality of […]

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Learning from the Lives Along the River

  Given the intense election coverage of the past few months, you would be forgiven if you missed the news of some big environmental catastrophes. Several weeks ago, Cedar Rapids endured a massive flood. In the month prior, flooding in Baton Rouge caused the area’s largest natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy. Simultaneously, rising levels of […]

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Mississippi River Program Navigates New Currents

Shifting water quality issues Over the past few months, I have had the good fortune of engaging with several McKnight board members and staff members to examine new ways of focusing the Mississippi River program’s strategies. Mississippi River water quality is one of those glass-of-water issues that can look half-empty or half-full depending on one’s perspective. A lot […]

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Mark Muller: Nitrates in drinking water causing friction in Iowa

It’s been a contentious month for water quality in Iowa. In early March the Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) announced that the utility will file a federal suit against three rural counties in northwest Iowa for nitrate pollution. Residents of Des Moines and other nearby municipalities receive tap water that originates from the Raccoon and […]

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Mark Muller: Small business owners value clean water and support strong rules

Sometimes the gift of hindsight makes history appear less complicated than it actually was. Much of the environmental progress of the 1970s now seems obvious, and not just to traditional environmentalists — after all, few people would regret the steps taken to reverse the Mississippi River’s status as a “cesspool.” The quality of life and […]

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